KEITH GARFIELD - ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF COMPUTER SCIENCE

Dr. Garfield obtained his PhD in Computer Science from UCF in 2006. His research focus includes foundations of modeling and simulation techniques and artificial intelligence applications. He has participated  in several NextGen programs at the Florida Test Bed (FTB).  As a Technical lead with Dr. Kelly Neville  for Task G, 4D FMS and Trajectory Based Operations, Dr. Garfield formed and led a team to develop a proposal to create a Human in the Loop (HITL) Simulation Plan to study 4D aircraft trajectories with Required Time of Arrivals. This work resulted in an HITL simulation performed at the FTB in 2010. Dr. Garfield also performed software inspections and assisted in the preparation of contract deliverable documents for the development of the Task H, Advanced Technologies and Oceanic Procedures, software tools. As a Co-Project Iead with Dr. Richard Stansbury for Task K, Flight Data Object, Dr. Garfield performed benefits analyses, participated in standardization of FDO standards, and assisted in the development of scripts and scenarios for two demonstrations held at the FTB in 2011. Finally, Dr. Garfield developed and administered a software assessment process and tool by which deliverable software was assessed for Task P, Flight Information Services.

VITALY S. GUZHVA - PROFESSOR OF FINANCE

Vitaly S. Guzhva, Ph.D., CFA, is an Associate Professor in the College of Business at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University where he teaches Finance, Economics, and Safety courses. Dr. Guzhva has participated in multiple NEAR Lab research projects that required cost-benefit and/or advanced statistical analysis, including FAA-sponsored projects such as: Benefits of 4D Trajectory Based Operations, Aircraft Arrival Management System, Key Spaceport Planning and Design Requirement Study, Airborne Execution of Flow Strategies, and others.

 

SHAFAGH JAFAR - ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF SOFTWARE ENGINEERING

Dr. Shafagh Jafer is an Assistant Professor of Software Engineering at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, FL. She received her Ph.D. Degree in Computer Engineering from Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada, in 2011 where she was awarded the Senate Medal for Outstanding Academic Achievement for her doctoral thesis on large-scale parallel simulation. For the past eight years she has been conducting research on discrete-event modeling and simulation, distributed and parallel simulation, software engineering, and integrated modeling environments. Dr. Jafar has been previously involved in projects dealing with modeling and simulation of natural disasters as well as emergency response to natural fire. She is currently conducting research in disaster engineering, modeling and simulation in aviation, and large-scale NAS (National Airspace System) data analysis with the NEAR Lab as a part of the FAA’s NextGen projects.

ANDREW J. KORNECKI - PROFESSOR OF SOFTWARE ENGINEERING   

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Dr. Kornecki is a Professor of Software Engineering at ERAU. He earned his Masters in Electrical Engineering and Ph. D. degree in Technical Science at the AGH University of Science and Technology in Krakow.  He came to ERAU in 1990 as an Associate Professor in the Computer and Software Engineering Department. He was a visiting researcher for the FAA in 1992 and became a Professor at ERAU in 1992. He has worked with the NEAR lab on many NextGen projects, as well as researching and developing curriculum and teaching methods at ERAU. He has worked on many FAA projects with the NEAR lab including Software development tools with automatic code generation features, real-time simulation development and training, and tasks for the NextGen project.

TOM LIPPS - ADJUNCT FACULTY, COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

Tom Lipps is a Project Manager and Adjunct Professor of the College of Business at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. He has decades of experience in public service in Michigan and Florida as City Manager Assistant, Project Coordinator, Consultant, Support Services Director, and most recently as the Airport Manager in Deland, Florida. With so much experience in public service, assisting and managing in city and airport work, Mr. Lipps was an important addition to the NEAR Lab team for various projects.

 

KELLY NEVILLE -HUMAN FACTORS & SYSTEMS   

Dr. Neville is an Associate Professor of Human Factors at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University’s Daytona Beach campus, where she has taught cognitive psychology, ergonomics, systems engineering concepts, cognitive systems engineering, research methods, human factors, and complex systems courses since 2007. She earned her M.A. and Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology from Rice University. Her B.A., also in Psychology, is from Trinity University.

Dr. Kelly Neville has a rich and varied background in conducting research that has the goal of facilitating and enhancing human and team performance in complex systems. She specializes in training design, training need analysis, work support design, and new technology integration in complex work domains. Her work in these areas extends across a number of complex work domains including satellite operations, military command-and-control, U.S. Marine Corp combined arms operations, air combat, unmanned aircraft systems (UAS), and petrochemical processing operations.

DAWNA L. RHOADES - CHAIR AND PROFESSOR OF MANAGEMENT, MARKETING AND OPERATIONS

Dr. Dawna L. Rhoades is a Professor and the chair of Management, Marketing and Operations in the College of Business at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach. Her research interests include airline strategy, intermodal and sustainable transportation, and NextGen technology and implementation. The NextGen projects she has worked on include the integration of predictive weather into ERAM and cost-benefit analysis for synchronized FMS-ERAM trajectories in an Optimized Profile Descent (OPD). Her published work has appeared in journals such as the Journal of Air Transport Management, Journal of Managerial Issues, Managing Service Quality, World Review of Science, Technology, and Sustainable Development, and The Handbook of Airline Strategy. She is the author of Evolution of International Aviation: Phoenix Rising (2008) and the Editor in Chief of the World Review of Intermodal Transportation Research.

REMZI SEKER - PROFESSOR OF ELECTRICAL, COMPUTER, SOFTWARE AND SYSTEMS ENGINEERING

Dr. Remzi Seker is a Professor of Electrical, Computer, Software, and Systems Engineering. Before joining Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, he was Professor and Chair of Computer Science Department at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock where he was also leading the Assurance, Security and Software Usability Research and Education (ASSURE) Lab. Dr. Seker’s research interests are safety and security-critical systems. His research is motivated by the rapid penetration of computer-based technologies into our society. When computer-based technologies become commodities on which people rely, society becomes increasingly vulnerable to disruptions offered by these technologies. Dr. Seker, as a researcher, focuses on ways to address the asymmetric threats that arise from a rapid, necessary, use of technology. He is co-author of one of the first papers that was published on Mobile Phishing and possible techniques for preventing it. Dr. Seker serves on the ACM and IEEE Computer Society Computing Curriculum: Computer Science 2013 (CS2013) Committee. He is also a member of the three-person sub-committee designing the first Cyber Security Knowledge Area. He also served as a Department of Homeland Security Software Assurance (SwA) Forum Working Group member. Dr. Seker teaches continuing education classes for IEEE. His research has been funded by Acxiom, the Office of Rural Health, the National Science Foundation, the Department of Defense, and the Federal Aviation Administration.

RICHARD S. STANSBURY - ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF COMPUTER ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE   

Dr. Richard S. Stansbury is an Associate Professor of Computer Engineering and Computer Science at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU), Daytona Beach, FL. As a NEAR Lab affiliate, Dr. Stansbury supports FAA research in NextGen and Commercial Space Transportation. He has supported research related to the Flight Object as a mechanism for exchanging flight information within the NextGen system. He has also supported the development of a rocket-rated ADS-B prototype to safely integrate commercial space traffic into the national airspace. In February 2013, a fully functioning rocket-rated ADS-B prototype payload reached an altitude of 94,000 ft on-board a high altitude balloon.

In addition, his early UAS research, funded by the FAA, focused upon the survey of current and near-term future UAS technologies and their regulatory impact (through a regulatory gap analysis). This research has been continued under a grant from NASA. Starting in 2010, Dr. Stansbury began development, as co-Project Leader of a multidisciplinary team, on an unmanned aircraft for NOAA to provide in-situ measurement of atmospheric conditions within tropical cyclones - the Gale UAS. An initial field test of the Gale UAS was performed in fall 2012 with a follow-up flight in spring 2013.